Honey, What happened to the kids?

When I was in Primary School wearing pink would make me a “Townie”, all boys smelt and I never ever wanted to grow boobs. Today I’m walking down the aisle’s in supermarkets seeing padded bras for age 6+, scrolling down my Facebook newsfeed to see 15 year olds flaunting their baby scans and teenage girls wearing more makeup that your average Geordie on a night out.

Call me traditional, but I want my daughter to be dressed in cute, pretty clothing, appropriate for the weather, occasion, and more importantly, their age. But maybe I’m wrong in thinking that will be easy in the world we live in today.

“It’s funny how a man only thinks about the… You got a real big heart, but I’m looking at your… You got real big brains, but I’m looking at your… Girl, there ain’t no pain in me looking at your…”

These degrading, provocative lyrics were teamed with raunchy dance moves, a lack of clothing and a far from natural amount of make-up on the Pussy Cat dolls track, Beep. But as a single that reached 2nd in the UK chart and was part of the track list on two of the most popular CD’s sold to teenage girls, ‘Pop Party’ and ‘Now that’s what I call music 63’, was there any way of getting away from it with technology dependent generation?

Nicole Shirt-slinger, the lead singer of the Pussycat dolls, is just one of too many wrongly idolized women. The extent of editing and makeup that is pursued on her appearance, and most other female celebrities in the spot light, is so idealized that most girls can’t attain it. And call me crazy, but I feel Nicole looks so much better without make up on. Why is it that I had to go out of my way to find a picture of her ‘au’naturale’, but her fictitious face is flaunted everywhere I look.

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In the past month I’ve seen 3 girls on my Facebook, younger than 18, uploading photographs of their “modeling shoot”. These weren’t the kind of photo’s you’d frame and give to your grandparents to display on their mantle-piece. They were the kind you’d see in those top-shelf magazines, that would please the lovely gentleman you see, that drive the white vans.

Young girls shouldn’t be posed up against poles, enhancing their pre-pubescent chests, caked in collection 2000 makeup, wearing revealing garments which display deceitful slogans. But if it’s available and publicized everywhere, how do we stop it?

The problem with the fashion available for young girls today is that it’s allowing them to advertise themselves without even realising it. Promoting the idea that women and girls are being viewed, treated, portrayed and groomed as sexual objects.

I’ve seen t-shirts for girls aged 4+ bearing the slogan “Future WAG” and 3.5 inch high heels being sold in New Look, starting at size one- the size of an average 8 year old. Not only is this dressing young girls like sexually available women, it isn’t ideal for growing feet.

In addition I noticed that the shorts were getting shorter, the shirts were getting tighter and the slogans were getting more suggestive. It seems that today’s young girl doesn’t want to own a plastic Barbie doll, instead she wants to be one.

So in a generation where teenage girls are hidden behind a mask of make up, an armor of Paul’s Boutique and are the mother to a child instead of a furby, is there any chance of getting our little angels back?

Let me leave you with this genuine photograph of just one of the 100,000 American children, under the age of 12, which take part in U.S child beauty patents.

highglitttt

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17 thoughts on “Honey, What happened to the kids?

  1. It’s incredibly sad but true. I also find that some fault lies in your traditional fairy tales i.e. Snow White, Sleeping Beauty. Little girls are taught if they are pretty enough that the prince charming will swoop in on his white horse to make life a bed of roses and live happily ever after. The only time I can think that this isnt the case is the movie Shrek- but turns out she was “cursed” to be ugly and had to use her wits and brains to survive. hmmmmmm 🙂

  2. World is getting crazy eh?? This is somehow sad for me, knowing that more and more people are depending to their “outer” look…and pay less attention to what really matter inside….nice observation you have done here 😀😀😀

  3. loving this post! And I’m totally using the term “fictitious face” next time I discuss celebs and their 2-inch thick make-up faces. Are you finding the girl culture in UK similar to the examples you discussed here from U.S.?

  4. “Call me traditional, but I want my daughter to be dressed in cute, pretty clothing, appropriate for the weather, occasion, and more importantly, their age. But maybe I’m wrong in thinking that will be easy in the world we live in today.”….I am seriously on your side on this :)….http://justmikemon.wordpress.com/2013/03/03/there-is-a-voice-behind-every-dressing/

  5. “And call me crazy, but I feel Nicole looks so much better without make up on. Why is it that I had to go out of my way to find a picture of her ‘au’naturale’, but her fictitious face is flaunted everywhere I look” 🙂

  6. “Young girls shouldn’t be posed up against poles, enhancing their pre-pubescent chests, caked in collection 2000 makeup, wearing revealing garments which display deceitful slogans. But if it’s available and publicized everywhere, how do we stop it?”…..VERY BIG QUESTION !!!

  7. “……is there any chance of getting our little angels back?”…. I wish i had an answer to this question QQ

  8. This is an awesome post. It feels good to read from someone with a like mind. Weldone ! I hope someone would read it and make a change somewhere 🙂

  9. Very entertaining writing style. I agree, children should be children (in the way they dress and appear). While it’s true that a lot of celebrities are idolized, I think in order to “stop it,” parents should be responsible for what they are allowing their children to wear/do/etc. and what values should be promoted because we’re never going to be stop the pussy cat dolls and whoever else from looking seductive or singing degrading lyrics. Not very many children I know work or can walk into a store to buy cropped tops and high heels without their parent’s money, so parents are where the buck should stop.

  10. Very well said Zoe. I know where you’re coming from. I absolutely agree with the point you made about girls wanting to becoming Barbie dolls rather than having one.

    I was in the city the other day and it really surprised me to see these young children dressing well over their age. I guess what surprised me even more is the fact that children are acting like the way they dress. It’s just really sad to see! Kids should dress and act like kids.

  11. its pretty ridicouls what the world is turning in to for young girls. :(. but your post was completely true.

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