Build your own dreams, or someone else will hire you to build theirs

Unfortunately there’s a time in your life where answering, “A princess” to the question, “So what do you want to be when you’re as old as mummy and daddy?” isn’t acceptable.

Whilst I was at sixth form, at the age of 17, I had to decide on what I wanted to study at University and where I was going to pursue it. Coincidentally, at this age I also had absolutely no idea of what career path I wanted to follow. And what was worse, it seemed that everyone else around me had already decided where they were going and what they were doing.

Obviously not everyone wanted to go to University, I mean some people were happy with a job in Topshop for the rest of their life, but where’s the dream in that? For me, University has always been a plan. I felt, and still feel, that 18 was too young to end full time education, but also too young to start full time work. I mean, who wants to be working 9-5 when there’s jäger bombs out there that need drinking?

But what was I going to study at University? 3 years is a long time to stay motivated on just one subject and £9,000 is a huge amount to go in-debt to, to something that you’re unsure about. So I listened to my teachers and my family, who both suggested that as I was uncertain of the career path I wanted to follow, I should take a degree on something I enjoyed and was good at, as it would help me to stay motivated and achieve a high grade. So that’s why I took Fashion Studies.

Of course I’ve had my days, normally once I’ve handed in a deadline, where I’ve absolutely loved it and have wanted to spend the rest of my life working in the Fashion industry. But I’ve had a lot more days where, although I’ve been enjoying what I’m doing and am working hard, I just know I wouldn’t be happy doing it forever.

And about a week ago, a light bulb switched on in my brain, a bulb that had flickered similar thoughts many years ago. I’d decided, well re-decided, that I wanted to be a primary school teacher. I love children, helping others and I’m a little bossy. The hours are perfect, the pay is good and the holidays are very generous. I don’t know what it was that made me suddenly decide or what it was that really put a full stop to any more ideas, but I’m so glad it happened.

Once I’ve finished my third year in Lincoln, I plan to pursue a Postgraduate Certificate in Education Primary Level (PGCE), at the UEA, in September 2014. It is an 8.30am-5.30pm course, 5 days a week, which lasts 38 weeks and includes at least 120 days work based in schools.

After a little research, I discovered that if I continue to get the grades I’ve been getting, (I got a 2:1 for second year, yay), I should still have a chance to get on the course. My degree is just as beneficial for the course as one would be in any other subject, so I have absolutely no regrets. I know that if I were to have done a more academic degree, I wouldn’t have enjoyed it as much, therefore would not have been as motivated.

Life is too hard to do something because it’s the ‘easy option’, and I know this is the perfect job for me. There’s no problem with a well-dressed teacher. I mean, just as Oscar Wilde stated, “You can never be too overdressed or overeducated”.

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A good photo keeps a moment from running away

Many, many years ago the only way you could remember a moment was by memory. Years after that, when men paired top hats with pipes, and women donned corsets there was ‘film photography’ that, held up to the light, would show small black and white photographs often alongside blurs and exposure problems. Today we have the ability to snap, save and amend as many photos as we desire… And then leave it on our iPhones to never be seen again.

 Don’t get me wrong, technology has done wonders to our world, but very few nowadays experience that feeling of flicking through a photograph album, rewinding the memories and reliving the emotional connection.

 On the 7th of May I decided to spend my money on something other than Topshop and Nando’s, I ordered 96 photo prints from Printstagram.

 Stating the obvious, Printstagram works alongside instagram, allowing the customer to choose from a variety of ways to print out their very own photographs. Whether you want your photographs printed onto a calendar, a poster, into a book, a memory box, framed or simply into square mini prints then you can. It is a new company and as their e-mail stated, “they really appreciate the support”.

 I chose to have mine developed simply into square prints, so that I have the option to frame them, put them into an album or stick onto my bedroom wall.

 Although the e-mail stated that they should arrive within 4-10 days, I was pleasantly surprised with them delivered to my door within 3.

 The prints were wrapped up so sweetly, and printed in such fine quality on a lustre soft white card. As soon as I got them out I wanted to put them back into the packaging, as they were so beautiful I didn’t want to touch them until I’d decided what to do with them.

I’ve put a photo below of me holding one of my prints so you can get an idea of the size.

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 24 prints cost $12 meaning that in total I spent $48, which is £31. At first I obviously hesitated as, for a student, this is a couple of nights out, and Prinstagram is a fairly new company with mixed reviews on other blogs. But if you haven’t already guessed, they were worth every single penny, and once I have uploaded another 24 photos onto instagram that I want to print I’m heading right back.

So whether you’re revising, catching up on towie or chilling out, head over to Printstagram now, you won’t regret it. Plus, you get a free sticker.

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And I can breathe again

 

“What course do you study at University?”, “Fashion Studies”, “Oh, so you spend 3 years colouring in?”. Fantastic.

I chose to pursue a degree in Fashion studies because I’ve always preferred working practically over academically, have a creative flare and a passion for fashion. Surprisingly enough it isn’t because it was the only course my grades allowed me to study and that they offer a £50 Topshop giftcard to whoever passes. In fact I left High school and Sixth form with 12 A-C GCSE’s and 1 A and 2 B’s at A Level resulting in enough UCAS points to have got on most of the courses at this University.

As a course, BA Fashion studies students are given freedom to work and no limits within what they design, whether it be a simple cotton shift dress, or a clowns outfit made from cellotape and pencil sharpening’s.  But if I want to walk away with at least a pass, there is absolutely no freedom within the amount of work needed to complete.

It grinds my gears when people say that Fashion is a cop out and University is just 3 years of drinking and sleeping. I’m not one to determine what other courses are like, but for me the last 2 years have been the hardest years of my life, and I have never put so much effort into something.

After a large number of all-nighters, tears and tantrums I’ve just ended my second year by handing in 20 sketchbooks/portfolios, over 10,000 words of essays and 4 final garments. And over this summer, I will have all of my Norfolk incestuous toes and fingers crossed, hoping that my hard work pays off when I receive my results, and that I can put to rest the upsetting myth, that us fashionista’s are brainless.

I hope that you’ll have yours crossed too

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